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Sachsen - Deutsches Weinanbaugebiet

Was den Franken ihr Bockbeutel, ist den Sachsen ihre Keule. Die eigentümliche Flasche, die an einen Bowlingkegel erinnert, wurde 1931 in der damaligen Weinbau-Versuchs- und Lehranstalt Hoflößnitz bei Dresden erfunden. Mit einem Museum, einer Weinstube und einem Weingut ist Hoflößnitz noch immer ein besuchenswertes Zentrum sächsischer Weinkultur. Mehr Informationen über das Deutsche Weinanbaugebiet Sachsen unter: www.weinbauverband-sachsen.de

Kategorien: Anbaugebiete
Württemberg - Deutsches Weinanbaugebiet

Dass zu jedem Wein ein passendes Glas gehört, wissen Sommeliers, Weinliebhaber und die Menschen in den Anbaugebieten. In Württemberg gibt es eine besonders merkwürdige Form, das Henkelglas. Das einzige Weinglas ohne Stiel hat seitlich einen praktischen Griff und wird meistens in den volkstümlichen Besenwirtschaften eingesetzt. Aus ihm werden Trollinger & Co. gerne „geschlotzt“, wie das genussvolle, schlürfende Trinken in der Region auch genannt wird, und zwar am häufigsten als „Viertele“ (0,25 Liter). Mehr Informationen über das Deutsche Weinanbaugebiet Württemberg unter: www.wwg.de

Kategorien: Anbaugebiete
Baden - German wine-growing region

Among the excellent white wines from Baden is the “Klingelber- ger”. This is simply a Riesling known by that name in the Ortenau. The name stems from the Klingelberg vineyard, part of the Schlossberg at Durbach where Margrave Carl Friedrich of Baden, master of the Staufenberg Castle winery, had Riesling planted in 1782. The fact that this vineyard was first planted with only a single variety, was an innovation at that time. More information about the German wine region of Baden at: www.sonnenmaennchen.de

Kategorien: English
Franken - German wine-growing region

One of the most famous Franken vineyards and the oldest documented vineyard site by name in Germany is the “Würzburg Stein”. Steinwein has long been a synonym for Franken wine. A 1540s Steinwein is today still stored in the cellar of the Bürgerspital winery in Würzburg. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the German national poet, was a pronounced connoisseur of Steinwein. On 17 June 1806 he wrote to his wife Christiane: “Please send me some Würzburg wine, no other wine tastes as nice, and I am in a surly mood if I lack my usual favourite drink.” More information about the German wine region of Franken at: www.haus-des-frankenweins.de

Kategorien: English
Hessische Bergstrasse - German wine-growing region

The Oden- wald forest has an “island”, namely the Odenwald wine island. This is of course not a real island, but a small wine-growing region slightly separated from the rest of the Hessische Bergstraße around the town of Groß-Umstadt to the west of Darmstadt. Wine is cultivated here on a mere 62 hectares not far from the Hessian metropolis Frankfurt am Main which also has a vineyard, the Lohberg. However, this is firstly part of the Rheingau region, and secondly the Frank- furt people explicitly prefer a different kind of wine – that made from apples – called “Ebbelwoi”. More information about the German wine region of Hessische Bergstrasse at: www.bergstraesser-wein.de

Kategorien: English
Mittelrhein - German wine-growing region

The town of Bacharach has several distinctive steep slopes. According to an old saying the best wines are grown in Bacharach, and Pope Pius II had a barrel of Bacharach wine delivered to Rome every year. But there is also a very flat vineyard. It is situa- ted on a 680 by 150 metre island in the Rhine and is called “Heyles’en Werth” after its former owner Hans Heyles. Today the island is cultivated by a winemaking family from Bacharach. They do not only need strong legs like the steep slope vintners but also muscular arms as the island can only by reached by rowing boat. More information about the German wine region of Mittelrhein at: www.mittelrhein-wein.de

Kategorien: English
Mosel - German wine-growing region

The most ex- pensive sale of a vineyard to date took place in 1900 when the mayor of Bernkastel sold 4,300 square metres of the vineyard named “Doc- tor” to a certain Carl Wegeler – for 100 gold marks per vine. In today’s money that would be about 600 to 700 Euro per vine. The investment was worthwhile, however, as the vineyard is now one of the most famous in the world and best in the region. Its peculiar name derives from the fact that in 1630 the Archbishop Bohe- mund of Trier was ill but surprisingly recovered after a few sips of wine and thus awarded the title of Doctor to the vineyard. More information about the German wine region of Mosel at: www.msr-wein.de

Kategorien: English
Nahe – German wine-growing region

The Nahe also has a wine route – like almost every region. But the Nahe vintners are working to- gether with the German Gemstone Route, after all, the German gemstone stronghold Idar-Oberstein is not far away. Every year a special wine edition in a special decorative bottle is put on the market. It is called “Edelschliff” (noble cut). Every bottle is furnished with a precious stone – in 2010, it was an epi- dote, and inside the bottle is a liquid gem: a selected wine from the Nahe! More information about the German wine region of Nahe at: www.weinland-nahe.de

Kategorien: English
Pfalz - German wine-growing region

The Deutsche Weinstraße goes through many typical wine villages with timber- framed houses where vines are growing across the road. Once a year, on the last Sunday in August, on an event-filled day the entire German Wine Road is re- served for pedestrians and cyclists: an 80 kilometre long wine festival with more than 300,000 cyclists, walkers and skaters! More information about the German wine region of Pfalz at: www.pfalzwein.de

Kategorien: English
Rheingau - German wine-growing region

The town of Hoch- heim am Main is also located in the Rheingau region. This wine town with its famous wines is the origin of the term “Hock” for Rhine wine which is still used in Eng- land today. The term probably became popular after Queen Victoria visited Hochheim in 1845. Due to the good taste of the Hochheim wines and the benefits to health attributed to them the phrase “a good Hock keeps off the doc!” had established itself rather quickly. Even a century ago wines from the Rheingau were among the most ex- pensive on wine lists throughout the world, and especially in England. More information about the German wine region of Rheingau at: www.rheingauer-wbv.de

Kategorien: English